The Poet Looks Out the Window

The Poet Looks Out the Window
Minute Poetry

Oh, bless this tree outside my room—
a home, a womb
where words are born,
a page adorned—
poet’s enclave,
creative cave.

These branches beckon many birds
with songs sans words.
They bring us joy,
distress destroy,
plaintive cries, too,
to mourn with you.

And there above, I spy a nest.
Robin Redbreast?
Perhaps a Jay?
Oh look! Today,
sweet finch I see.
Inspire me!

Photo: Victoria Slotto
View from My Office “Treehouse”

Today at dVerse MTB Frank Hubeny invites us to try Minute Poetry. Don’t be afraid of this very fun form. It seemed daunting to me at first, but when I diagrammed it, I found it to be easy enough with the help of Rhymezone.com. My ornamental pear tree looks a bit shabby right now because the harsh winter and severe winds was causing it to damage our house and we had to have it pruned. But when it’s at it best, in autumn, it is truly a delight and the migrating birds love the tiny pears that are just for them, not humans.

Please join us–give it a whirl. BTW, this poem is also inspired by Lillian’s window prompt from Tuesday Poetics.

 

feather art–dVerse Poetics

I’m hosting for Tuesday’s dVerse Poetics and am looking for poetry about feathers. Please join us with a poem of your own.

Photo: V. Ceretto

Photo: V. Ceretto

 

feather art

she would paint feathers, she told me,
would spend her days waiting
for feathers fluttering to earth
borne on gentle zephyrs
feathers fallen to the ground
those scattered by a bird of prey
the bodies of a sparrow or a wren

she chooses brushes carefully
(the finest sables) or a nib
she’d load with color or with ink
to focus on delicate detail
outlining veins and every plume
the clash of color line and shape

for feathers are what makes a bird a bird,
she says, and wonders why the jays glow blue
and orioles gold and how to capture iridescence
such glorious structures fractal-ly complex

her studio’s awash in brilliant quills
exotic colors luminous light
collected on the beach and desert floors
some in the mountain heights on trails
and in her garden bed beneath the trees

her work is like a prayer, she says,
a mystical mandala journey to within
she dips her pen into the very heart
of our creation’s source, and recreates
the energy that throbs beneath
the skin of every living being

Image: Public Domain

Image: Public Domain

 

 

Waiting–dVerse Haibun Monday

Photo: David Slotto

Photo: David Slotto

Waiting
a Haibun

Anna waited. And waited. Her room, dark except for light seeping through half-drawn blinds, smelled musty, old. Dust motes danced where sun invaded. Aside from that, there was little activity. Even her old cat, Flossie, lay motionless on the rumpled covers of her bed.

They hadn’t called for at least two weeks. No one called or came to visit anymore. She wasn’t sure why she even had a landline, but she wasn’t about to try to figure out those smart gadgets that all the young folk held continuously in their hands, their eyes locked on the screen. No one had the time or patience to teach her all that fancy stuff.

Outside the window she heard birdsong. Even the birds had something to say to each other. Anna pulled herself slowly to her feet and went to fill their feeder. What else would fill the hours?

in spring, finches’ songs
fill the empty hours, the void
without them, nothing

Please join in for dVerse Haibun Monday where we are talking about communication! The link will be open all week! The doors open today at 3:00 PM EDT

Monday Meanderings–Welcome, Rain. Please Stay Awhile

The Truckee River, 2014--only a block from our home. It is usually fast and full, fed by Tahoe. Photo: KTVN News Channel 2

The Truckee River, 2014–only a block from our home. It is usually fast and full, fed by Tahoe.
Photo: KTVN News Channel 2

While much of the United States has been inundated with precipitation of one sort or another, we in the West have just suffered through our third year of drought. Our beautiful maple tree, in the front yard is languishing and if we lose it, we have mentioned the possibility of xeriscape, which seems so logical for those of us living in desert climates. (Reno, in Northern Nevada, is nestled in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, about 40 minutes from Lake Tahoe. It is classified as high desert.)

At the moment, I turn my head to look out the window, at a lovely gentle rainfall. The bare ornamental pear tree right next to me is decorated with pendulous drops of water. To the West and North of us, there is a fine dusting of snow that hasn’t quite reached our 4500 ft. elevation. My prayer is that this lovely gift of rain will hang around for a while and water our barren land. But gently, I think, to give it time to soak in (I recall two floods we’ve experienced since moving here in 1993.)

Photo: Victoria Slotto Ornamental Pear Tree in Winter.

Photo: Victoria Slotto
Ornamental Pear Tree in Winter.

This morning “my” tree was full of birds, feasting on the tiny, inedible-to-human pears that still remain. Finches, Jays, a Chickadee–the first I’ve seen here, robins and doves compete. On the ground and in the huge blue spruce in the front yard, quail wait out the winter. Their babies, which delight us in fair weather, are mature now.

Will we have snow this year? Last year only one snowfall made its way to us just in time to get dirty or melt for Christmas. But for today, it’s a very light rain. Please stay a while.

Photography 101: Moment and Swarm

Moment

Photo: V. Slotto Attempt to capture the wind in the trees and falling leaves...not so successful.

Photo: V. Slotto
Attempt to capture the wind in the trees and falling leaves…not so successful.

Photo: D. Slotto My husband's quite successful attempt--this is a Leucistic Hummingbird that stayed with us for a while.

Photo: D. Slotto
My husband’s quite successful attempt–this is a Leucistic Hummingbird that stayed with us for a while.

Swarm

Photo: Slotto Sparrows at our improvised feeder.

Photo: Slotto
Sparrows at our improvised feeder.

Photo: V. Slotto Herbs and tomatoes from our garden, chestnuts to be roasted for Thanksgiving. A swarm of homegrown abundance.

Photo: V. Slotto
Herbs and tomatoes from our garden, chestnuts to be roasted for Thanksgiving. A swarm of homegrown abundance.

Feathered Totem

Photo: David Slotto Palm Desert 4/11

Photo: David Slotto
Palm Desert 4/11

I am…
the cawing raven
crying magic, mystery,
circling your life with
power of creation.

I am…
the brilliance of the eagle
spanning space between the earth
and sky, carrying your spirit
to the top of distant mountains.

I am…
the lowly mourning dove
echoing the sound of longing
deep within your emptiness
that God alone can fill.

I am…
the joy of hummingbird
dancing in the morning dew,
drinking golden nectar,
nourishing your soul.

Linked to Marina Sofia’s prompt for dVerse Poetics. Come on over and welcome her as our newest pubtender. The prompt is to write about animals. The photo is of the Leucistic Hummingbird that visited us in April, 2011.

For the Birds–Monday Meanderings

I have a great appreciation for the beauty of birds. They teach us to depend on nature, to live in the present moment, to enjoy the freedom we are given, to fly in a manner of speaking. Today, I’ll simply share a few photos taken by my husband.

If you feed them, they will come.

(Copyright: David Slotto 2014. Kindly request permission to use them.)

Feeding Time A Twice Daily Event Palm Desert Photo: D. Slotto

Feeding Time
A Twice Daily Event
Palm Desert 2011
Photo: D. Slotto

2013  reno birds,blooms,garden 004b

Quail
Reno, NV
2013
Photo: D. Slotto

Cedar Waxwing Reno 2011 Photo: D. Slotto

Cedar Waxwing
Reno
2011
Photo: D. Slotto

Leucistic Hummingbird Palm Desert CA 2011 Photo: D. Slotto

Leucistic Hummingbird
Palm Desert CA
2011
Photo: D. Slotto

Bullock Oriole Reno, NV 2012 Photo: D. Slotto

Bullock Oriole
Reno, NV
2012
Photo: D. Slotto