November–Monday Meanderings

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The month of November witnesses the transition from brilliant color splashes of autumn to the stark barrenness of winter. As I walk by the Truckee River or sit in my sacred space, looking out the window at the ornamental pear tree and the birds who drop by for a snack, nature offers inspiration, often only as an opening line to a poem. This morning, while walking the dogs, I discovered the body of a woodpecker laying on a boulder. In its stillness I was able to observe it in detail, the perfection of patterns in its feathers, the play of color, the blend of beauty and fragility. Later in the day, or possibly tomorrow, I expect a poem to write itself. A clear theme of dying, the reality of loss, reflects the change of seasons and my years of work with death and dying.

What influences your writing? How do your poems most often present themselves to you? Is it, perhaps, in the unfolding of your daily life, the prompts that are offered at dVerse and other poetry communities? Or is it always something unexpected, surprising?

I’m pleased to announce that print copies of Jacaranda Rain, Collected Poems, 2012 are now available through Amazon.com and are offered through all of their distribution sources. There are revisions and additions in this copy.

Cover Art: V. Slotto Photo: D. Slotto

Cover Art: V. Slotto
Photo: D. Slotto

I will revise the Kindle edition as well, as soon as I recover from an elbow tendonitis. In the meantime, I’m having to limit my use of the computer though, as always, I will visit those who comment, post (I hope) on Open Link Night and host Saturday’s Poetics. In the meantime, have a happy, productive week.

Monday Morning Writing Prompt–Gardening

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Image by uBookworm via Flickr

For many of us, as summer arrives, it’s time to garden. Weeding, pruning roses, planting a vegetable garden, planting annuals–then sitting back and enjoying the work of our hands–these activities occupy our leisure time. Those of you in other parts of the world are experiencing the end of the growing season. For some, planters or houseplants may be the extent of your involvement with growing things. Whatever your gardening experience–planting or putting to bed for winter–let’s write a gardening poem, essay or short story.

In my experience, working the land offers plenty of fodder to my creative muse. Rich in metaphor and opportunities for description, gardening does inspire.

I hope this prompt will be fun for you and that you will share your work by submitting your link in the comments of this post. Invite someone else to join us, if you will.

Here’s mine:

Skeletal Remains 

Clearing out dead leaves,

I unearth a pattern of life—

lace-knit frames for grace.