For the month of July, Jilly is offering a wonderful prompt on collaborative poetry. At the end of this post, I will give you the basics as she presented them, but be sure to visit her site where she gives an inspirational introduction.

In this post, I have written the first half of a poem. The challenge is for one of you to complete it and post it, following Jilly’s instructions.

This poem is written in tercets, 3-line poetry, without rhyme but using  an iambic beat, regardless of the number of iambs. Looking at the first line of this poem, the beat is da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM–that is, the heavy accent on the DUM, there being 7 iambs. I’ve numbered the rest of them. If you would like to play with my half to make it all the same, go for it.

7-5-17 Revision to add stanzas contributed by Maureen Sudlow and Jilly, the hostess of this prompt. Maureen’s are in Green and Jilly, in Purple.

7-7-17 Another revision, adding stanza’s by Charley in Brown. Great sift from being to doing.

Photo: David Slotto

 

Who Am I, You Ask

I am the tiny finch who fills the air with song at dawn. (7)
I am the bronze of sun on snow-capped hills. (5)
I am the play of wind upon the leafy ash. (6)

I am the ocean’s waves caressing sand and shells. (6)
I am the youthful fool—reckless, full of joy. (6–the dash as a soft beat)
I am the ache of old ones shuttered in the dark. (6)

I am the crumpled fading leaves
the glint of sun on foam-capped waves
I am the dust of planets born

I am the healing for the ancients breaking down the glass. 
I am the wisdom found in children – secreting the glee. 
I am the torrent deep who shapes the distant shores and sky. 

I am the wicked gale that tears the fertile blooms. 
I am the cresting dawn on valleys warm and lush. 
I am the eagle strong who silences the song.

I sing in many voices dawn and dusk that man ignores.
I bring the beauty forth in nature’s palates pure.
I breathe comfort that cools the heat or melts the snow.

I rock oceans deep, the stormy crash or gentle lull.
I energize the heated youth who sings out praise.
I agitate the longing for a final rest, a rescue home. 

HERE ARE JILLY’S ABBREVIATED INSTRUCTIONS:

The July Challenge is basically this:  Write half of a poem and open it up to fellow Challengers to finish it.  Since we are all fabulous poets, the greater challenge of this will not be the poetry, but the logistics, so I am including the steps.

  1. Write the first half of a poem
  2. Post it on your blog with a link back here to The July Challenge
  3. Include a little something about the form you are using. Is it Free Verse, Sonnet, Quadrille, etc?
  4. If you are using a form, please give a link to a site that explains that form or just give a little refresher.

HERE IS THE LINK TO JILLY’S JULY CHALLENGE: COLLABORATIVE POETRY

 

Jilly’s July Challenge–Collaborative Poetry, Revised

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A Good Morning–A Collaborative Haiku

sunrise

Image by Sean MacEntee via Flickr

I’m pleased to offer a collaborative Haiku that was written by a half-dozen talented poets in response to last week’s Monday Morning Writing Prompt. I’ve taken the liberty of naming it:

A Good Morning
a Collaborative Haiku

Morning sun wakens,
arouses a ruddy sky
with his tender touch.
   Victoria at https://liv2write2day.wordpress.com

Sunlight’s soft fingers
brush aside the veil of night.
A new day begins.
   Jinksy at http://pens-poems.blogspot.com/

Summer sun dries out
the lotus blossom’s wet home.
Its soul still lingers.
   Mike at http://thepoetsquill.wordpress.com/

Pearls on spear tips
gently healed, the lawn’s
wetness yields its breath.
   David at http://anointedruins.wordpress.com/

Night fades into day
birds chirp and squawk, then silence
change whispers, “arise.”
   Lorna at http://lornasvoice.wordpress.com/

Moon-shrouded gecko
vanishes with the sunrise
and the dawning dew.
   Gayle at http://bodhirose.wordpress.com/

Thank you all for your participation…let’s do it again!

Wordsmith Wednesday: More About Haiku

Basho by Basho by Sugiyama Sanpû (1647-1732)

Image via Wikipedia

“In this mortal frame of mine…there is something called a wind-swept spirit, for it is much like thin drapery that is torn and swept away at the slightest stir of the wind.” Basho, 1687

Last week when I had limited Internet access I had time to read Jane Hirschfield’s informative and beautifully written book on Haiku: “The Heart of Haiku.” Focused on the life and works of the 17th Century Japanese word artist (and I would say, mystic) Basho, Hirschfield peppers her exposition with elegant examples and succinct instruction.

Most of the time, after I’ve completed reading a book on Kindle, I send it to the archives at Amazon and then recall it if there’s something I want to rehash. This book, however, will reside on my device both as a source of instruction and inspiration.

Here are a few brief points that I would like to share with you about the art of Haiku:

  • Unless something is seen with a fresh eye, it is not worth writing down. (after Basho)
  • While English Haiku is written using the 5-7-5 syllable line structure, Japanese poetry is based on sounds.
  • Haiku always evokes a season, either by name or association.
  • Haiku offers the chance to make emotional, spiritual and psychological discoveries.
  • Haiku seeks to eliminate the space between the poet and the object of his poem. This allows the poet to truly perceive the object.
  • The new perception becomes the basis for an inner response on the part of the poet and reader.
  • The five-line Tanka (or Waka) preceded the Haiku. The syllable count for Tanka is 5-7-5-7-7.
  • Another poetic form called Renga consists of 3 and 2 line stanzas that build on one another. This form lends itself to collaborative poetry.
  • Basho taught: “If you have three or four, or even five or seven extra syllables, but the poem still sounds good, don’t worry about it.”

I strongly recommend “The Heart of Haiku” to anyone who loves this poetic form, has an interest in Zen Buddhism, or just wants to write poetry in which every word resounds.

For this weeks conversation, I am posting a Haiku that I wrote and would love to see you build on it in a collaborative effort. So when you visit this post, read all the comments and use the last Haiku posted as a prompt for your own that you will then add to the comments. I hope there will be enough of a response that I can compile them into a separate post. Of course, you will be acknowledged for your contribution.

Here’s the introductory Haiku:

Morning sun wakens

Arouses a ruddy sky

With his tender touch.

For more information on the Haiku form, you may want to visit my previous post: “True Haiku” written in June of this year: https://liv2write2day.wordpress.com/2011/06/08/wordsmith-wednesday-true-haiku/

And this, my friends, is my 500th post! Thank you for all your encouragement.