dVerse Haibun Monday–‘Tis the Season?

Labeled for non-commercial reuse.

‘Tis the Season?

Quickmas is almost here.
It’s in the stores and catalogues.
Why time, why have you fled
and left me trailing far behind?

Slow down and savor now.
Don’t hurry so, my kindly friends,
lest life should hurry by
and quickly hurtle to its end.

For De’s prompt this Quadrille Monday at dVerse, using the word QUICK.

Advertisements

Koorogi Calls–dVerse Haibun Monday

Labeled for non-commercial reuse.

Koorogi Calls—dVerse Haibun Monday

Last night I sat out on the deck in utter darkness—alone except for the dogs. Our yard, and those surrounding me, resounded with the sounds of crickets. They came late this year, as did the tomatoes that are only beginning to ripen. David is away, up in the mountains for a few days. Picking up his chores, especially caring for his garden, has been a bit overwhelming. When he is gone, I become so aware of how easy it is to take him for granted. How very much he does for us.

I’m at an age now when one starts to think of, to live the late autumn of life. There is an urgency in it, assessing what is really important about this game we play, getting rid of what we no longer need, saying what needs to be said, savoring each moment—and so much more. Oh, I’m not circling the drain, not yet. At the same time, one reflects when cricket sings his urgent song.

the days are shorter
late summer, fading to fall
hurry now, cricket

I’m happy to be guest-hosting for dVerse Haibun Monday where the Kigo is Koorogi–Cricket. Come on by the pub!

Grandmother’s Collection–dVerse Quadrille Monday

Photo: Victoria Slotto

Grandmother’s Collection

I gather feathers—memories
of color, flight, texture and joy,
she said

and flowers pressed within
the pages of a heavy tome.

Close to my breast—the loves
of countless years. Thus,

within these twisting rivers, blue,
upon my gnarly hands,
I gather hope.

A quadrille is a poem of exactly 44 words, excluding the title. This week Lillian at dVerse asks us to use the word GATHER in our offering. You are invited to join in, read and share a poem at dVerse Haibun Monday

Owl Dreams–dVerse Haibun Monday

Owl Dreams

Aside from the plastic owl, impaled on a stick in my neighbor’s vegetable garden, owls seem to be elusive, even though I live in a mostly rural corner of the world. One time, a friend who lived ten miles up in the North Valley’s, showed up at my house with an owl’s wing that she found in the middle of her infrequently traveled road. I studied the details of the feathers with a heavy heart, marking how the fragility of life makes it even more beautiful.

Of course, owls themselves are predators, a necessary, though painful reality that affects all living things. We kill to survive. We live in awareness of the transience of our beings. The more powerful use the weaker to obtain what they need or want. But still I dream that someday we shall live in peace. And that someday I shall see a snowy owl.

shirofukuroo
white streak across snowy night
longing in darkness

Monday begins the week with Haibun at dVerse Poets Pub. I’m hosting this week and turned to a Kigo closely associated with winter, which seems to be barreling in here in Northern Nevada. I developed a keen appreciation for Owls when I was given Mary Oliver’s book of poetry: Owls and Other Fantasies–my introduction to this poet, one of my favorites. The prompt this week is FUKUROO-OWL. The shirofukuroo is the snowy ow. Please join us at the pub with your Haibun of 200 words or less of nonfiction prose followed by a seasonal haiku. The pub opens at 12 Noon EST.

dVerse Haibun Monday: Shimo No Koe, Voice of First Frost

Photo: Labeled for reuse

#Heartbroken

I awaken this morning to temperatures of 28 degrees Fahrenheit, open the back door and breathe in the purity of crisp, fresh air. Hoar frost designs sparkle on the deck and the vegetable garden sags—leaves like tears hang from the tomato and cucumber plants, light splashes of color awash on our maple and ash trees. The glory of the cerulean sky sings joy. Reality intervenes.

blood-red leaves appear
fall gently on the pavement
frost-beauty weeping

Today, I’m hosting Haibun Monday at dVerse Poets. The prompt is Shimo No Koe–Voice of First Frost. Please join in. The prompt is open all week.

Ash Tree, Barren–dVerse Haibun Monday

Photo: Victoria Slotto

Ash Tree, Barren
Haibun—Wabi Sabi

The ash tree that we planted, probably twenty years past, flourished until a few years ago. She not only offered the loveliness of her leaf-laden branches, she protected us from late afternoon sun and winds that howl from the west through Sierra Nevada’s Donner Pass. In autumn, she sheds dazzling gilt foliage and in spring an eruption of lime green buds poke out of her apparently dead branches.

A couple of years ago, after five years of severe drought, many of the branches failed to show growth. The dire shortage of rain, coupled with water restrictions, took their toll. This year, we had dead limbs removed and our tree is spouting out limbs from the places you would least expect.

harsh summers take toll
water, source of leaf-life, fails
on dead branch finch sings

This week I’m hosting dVerse Haibun Monday. The theme is Wabi-Sabi: the Japanese concept of imperfect beauty. To learn more please head over to dVerse, read the prompt and links offered, and add a poem of your own. Have a blessed week. The link will be open till Saturday.

Gold–dVerse Haibun Monday

Gold

I remember the scent of summers from my childhood—the sweet waft of delicate blossoms abuzz with bees, followed later by that of the small golden globes that grew from them. Oh, the soft touch of ripening skin, carefully tended by my watchful grandpa, who allowed no one close to them until they had come unto their fullness.

He’d let me watch the harvest, but not squeeze the fruit, almost as protective of it as he was with me. Then he’d pile me between Mama and him into his 1940-something red Ford pickup and we’d tootle down the hill to Mr. Dinwiddie’s whose enormous yard held a number of sprawling trees like our own.

At last, the day had come: let the games begin! He and Mama set out on their annual quest for gold—the gold of apricot jam. The competition was fierce. Grandma and I watched from afar as she read to me—“Once upon a time…” When the battle concluded, we tasted, but never declared the winner. We all savored gold.

spring blossoms give way
to succulent summer fruit
birds feast on the scraps

Photo: maxipixel: labeled for non-commercial reuse.

This week Grace is hosting Haibun Monday  at dVerse and asks us to share a nonfiction account from our warehouse of memories, followed by a haiku. This one goes way back to my very young childhood when my widowed mother and I still lived with my grandparents. And Dinwiddie was the man’s real name–not hard to forget!