The Good of the Poor

The Good of the Poor

About 1981 or 82, I sat in a cold church in Detroit, Michigan. I pulled my coat around me, barely noticing the cold, entranced, instead, by the strong voice of a diminutive woman clothed in just a white sari with blue edging. Fearlessly she proclaimed the need for more care for the poorest in our community, and she had the right to do so, as she was opening a shelter for the poorest in Detroit. Outside, winter winds howled. Within, I questioned how I could do more in my own mission of nursing the impoverished elderly.

After her talk, those of us who were engaged in such service were led to the basement for a reception. There, we had the opportunity to meet and greet Mother Teresa, one-by-one. The warmth of her words and her hug have remained with me, sometimes encouraging, sometimes chiding. I recall them now with deep gratitude.

Four tiny swallows
hound a lurking hawk—
winter desert sighs.

This week for dVerse Monday Haibun, Kim would like to have a take a look at handwriting of famous people. I have chosen that of Mother Teresa and am including a snippet of an analysis of her handwriting which fits my experience.

“Mother Teresa may have been diminutive in size, and shy of personality, but this sample shows that when she wanted something done, she found a way for it to be done. ”  To read the full article, follow the link HERE.

The pub opens Monday at 3:00 PM EST. Please join us!

Monday Morning Writing Prompt–A Day Late

As I get more and more immersed in the world of poetry, I’m forgetting other things that I’ve committed to. Yesterday I spent a lot of time reading wonderful poetry from Jingle’s Poetry Potluck and then met in person with my PA group (Poet’s Anonymous) to critique each others’ work. The bottom line: I forgot to post a writing prompt to jump-start the week for those of us who may be stuck.

So, for today, try writing a short piece of prose or poetry, perhaps memoir, about something you forgot that had unintended consequences and post a link in comments if you will.

Happy writing. Enjoy the process.