October–dVerse OLN


Photo: jcookfisher via Flickr Labeled for non-commercial reuse

Photo: jcookfisher via Flickr
Labeled for non-commercial reuse

October
Haibun

Recently, a red tail hawk sat on our fence, watching an assortment of jays, robins, quail and doves fattening themselves on the seeds in our garden. Spent cosmos and coreopsis shrugged, let nature have her way.

Hawk, the Messenger,
seeks tomorrow’s sustenance,
dove feasts, unaware.

All the work of putting the garden to bed for the winter has claimed our attention, turning it from creative pursuits. The tasks of autumn bring to mind those chores that face us later in life—clearing away the debris of spent dreams, wasted efforts—preparing the soil for what is yet to come.

Autumn smells pungent—
leaves moldering in crannies,
poems forgotten.

A few brilliant roses still persist in their efforts to boast their beauty, proving that nature is not as fussy as we are when it comes to choosing the colors she will wear, or what’s deemed appropriate as defined by the expectations of others. Bright pink and orange: how freeing!

Late blooming roses
struggle in October frost,
clash with changing leaves.

The Truckee river, a block from our home, is feeling the effect of this summer’s lack of rain. It is fed by beautiful Lake Tahoe, flows east through Reno and ends up in Pyramid Lake, home of the Paiute Indians. Snow fell this week, just above our elevation, in the Sierra Nevada and we will see more soon, hopefully. Reno is high desert, receiving only 7” of rain annually. We depend on the snowfall in the mountains and at the Lake.

Truckee, languid now,
flows gently through our city,
hopes for winter snow.

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18 thoughts on “October–dVerse OLN

  1. Sean Michael says:

    Very well described.

    Like

  2. Bryan Ens says:

    This is like a haibun version of the cubist forms we did a while ago. Love the many facets of autumn in this!

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  3. Autumn smells pungent—
    leaves moldering in crannies,

    The bad side of Autumn often shows itself at the wrong time!

    Hank

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  4. lynn__ says:

    I understand how all the work preparing for winter takes our attention away from more creative pursuits…and some poems are forgotten. Sounds like a pleasant place to live…or visit!

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  5. ladynyo says:

    Each section…a continuation of that before….is just delightful! You pulled me in with the Red Tailed Hawk….and the fattening doves!

    Lovely, Victoria. What a pleasure and delight to read this right now. Yes, the fall has just fallen here….50 degrees this morning and the leaves right on clue are dropping….but still no color change.

    Yes, bright pink and orange! How freeing!

    Jane

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  6. These read like those stepping stones depicted in the photo. Each leading to the next. Wonderful, Victoria!

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  7. Victoria, I enjoyed seeing your garden and river through your beautiful words. Autumn brings many changes in our gardens and our lives. All the best to you and your husband. Kathleen

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  8. Sue says:

    A lovely read Victoria, with some great imagery…

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  9. rosemawrites says:

    the imagery you used, Ms. Victoria, are breathtakingly wonderful. So as the metaphors. 🙂 ❤

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  10. The metaphors of autumn, and how you personalize her is what I love the most with this haibun. Wonderful writing.

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  11. thotpurge says:

    flowers clashing with leaves and forgotten poems…lovely images.

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  12. Bodhirose says:

    I so enjoyed your series of haibun, Victoria. I could see these in a journal…keeping record of how you dealt with the changing seasons and landscape.

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  13. Grace says:

    I admire each part, like a journal of the changing seasons in your part of the world. I must say our roses are having their last hurrah too, but sadly autumn is definitely here. I am specially touched by this part:

    The tasks of autumn bring to mind those chores that face us later in life—clearing away the debris of spent dreams, wasted efforts—preparing the soil for what is yet to come.

    Like

  14. mist twine says:

    I love this: “Spent cosmos and coreopsis shrugged”

    That and the last haiku are my favorite sections, but it’s all very well written.

    Like

  15. lillian says:

    This is all so beautiful, Victoria. My favorite line
    “Spent cosmos and coreopsis shrugged, let nature have her way.”
    I remember well the days of “cleaning” the garden when it succombed to autumn’s frost and shriveled vines. Somehow, I always managed to take out an apple pie, frozen a bit earlier, and the baking aroma — coupled with the aroma of burning leaves, brought comfort — it was nesting time.
    This is truly a beautiful read. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Brian says:

    The step-by-step nature of your poetry leads the reader gently.

    Like

  17. There is so much symbolism in preparing the garden (of our lives) for Winter, beautifully said Victoria.

    Like

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